Extruding

Northwest Territorial Mint: The Extruding Process
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From Billet to Sheet

The solid metal forms referred to as "billets" are dislodged from the steel containers and transported to the billet oven (shown at right), where they are reheated for 15 minutes at approximately 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit in preparation for the next step in the process. Using specially designed channel locks to collect the heated billets from the oven, technicians load the billets into a massive machine called an extruder, which operates under extreme pressure to fashion the heated forms into thin strips of soft, annealed metal.

The extruded strips are then sent to the roller, where they are rolled to precise thicknesses.

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Northwest Territorial Mint: Insights & Ideas
Silver Bar
Hot Topic: Extruded Bars

When Pan American Silver wanted a solution for minting 100 Troy Ounce silver bullion bars, Northwest Territorial Mint proposed manufacturing these from extruded silver which is then sand blasted and pressed. The result is a highly acclaimed bar purchased as an investment but prized for its beauty.

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Northwest Territorial Mint: In The News

Ancient Coins are Relatively Common

Northwest Territorial Mint: Did You Know?Digging up archeological artifacts is common in England, France, Spain, Italy, Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey, Syria, Israel, Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Tunisia and a dozen other countries where ancient coins are found. The Roman Empire was vast and spanned a thousand years. If you were a collector in England, you would see ancient coins for sale in every coin shop, often because a farmer in a field, or someone scavenging with a metal detector found them in the ground — sometime in hoards of thousands together, where some Roman subject long ago buried them for safekeeping. Museums usually get first pick, but most finds are of coins already in the museums, so they go on the market.