NWTMINT.com has been purchased by Ranger Industries, LLC. If you would like to start your own custom project, make sure to visit www.RangerCoin.com. This NWTMINT website will be taken down before Jan. 1st, 2020. Visit this page for more information

The Melt

Northwest Territorial Mint: Pouring the Molten Metal
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We're proud of the fact that we're a full-service mint, with the capability of completing every step of the minting process on site at our 42,000 square-foot facility. Our unparalleled expertise in working with metals in every form and at every stage of the production process is evident in the tangible quality of each product we create.

Creating the Billet

In our on-site metal processing facility, gold and silver are melted down and poured into billets. These are then pressed through a small rectangular opening, drawing them into long thin strips of soft annealed metal.

Once the billets are created, it is time to extrude them into long, flat strips.

Would you like more information on the types of minted items available from Northwest Territorial Mint? Request a FREE information packet with detailed information about custom coins and other minted products.

Northwest Territorial Mint: Insights & Ideas
gold pour
Hot Topic: Custom Melts & Pours

Artist Gary Hill approached Northwest Territorial Mint to produce a custom gold bar weighing 424 Troy Ounces, not exactly an ordinary request, but we did the complete project in house: the melt, the pour (shown), machining and engraving. The result was a New York gallery exhibition that received worldwide press. We enjoy challenge and welcome your unusual project.

Northwest Territorial Mint: In The News

Owl Coins

Northwest Territorial Mint: Did You Know?During most of the 5th century BC, Athens was the greatest power of the Aegean world. During that time, owl coinage became ubiquitous, featuring the goddess Athena on one side and an owl, with the letters “AQE” on the other. Athens restricted the issue of independent coins at most of the cities within her sphere of influence, creating an imperial currency. But as Athens declined and then was defeated by Sparta in 404 BC, the currency was increasingly pressed in bronze and clad in silver.